Mon. May 27th, 2019

BREXIT- here is why a ‘no deal’ may take the lead.

VOTE FOR AND AGAINST BREXIT

BREXIT VOTE

WHAT IS BREXIT

This is an abbreviation for the impending exit of Britain from the European Union. A change in relationship to the bloc on trade ,security and migration is expected once the deal scales through.

A debate highlighting the pros and cons of membership of the European Union ( EU ) has been on since the idea was birthed. The first referendum on membership was held in 1975, just three years after it joined the Union.

Former Prime Minister, David Cameron promised a national referendum in 2003, with hopes of settling the question. Mr Cameron planned to offer a ‘Remain or Leave’ option, having in mind that the remain option would win.

But on June 23, 2016, Britons voted for a hazily defined Brexit by 52 percent to 48 percent triggered by refugee crisis and migration.

WHAT DID THE VOTES SAY

Brexit votes has been divided as London, Scotland and Northern Ireland voted to remain in the EU. While England and Wales voted for Brexit, overcoming support to remain in the European union.

Map showing brexit vote
MAP OF BREXIT VOTE

WOULD THERE BE A DEAL OR NO DEAL

Ending 46 years of economic integration in one stroke is never going to be easy. And the Brexit process has been bedeviled by the same divisions that led to the referendum in the first place.

Both Britain’s main parties, the governing Conservatives and the Labour opposition are divided over what to do. The Parliament is factionalised that there may be no coherent plan most lawmakers would back.

Theresa May, British Prime Minister, spent 18 months negotiating a divorce deal with the European Union. But when she presented the plan to Parliament, it was rejected by a historic margin of 230 votes.

A formal notice under Article 50 of the European Union’s Lisbon Treaty has been presented on March 28, 2017. This legal process sets a two year path to departure, making a formal divorce date this coming March 29, 2019.

As the deadline nears, Mrs May and her government are trying to overcome impossible parliamentary arithmetic and get lawmakers to back her agreement with European leaders. The fantasy that Brexit would be easy is crumbling.

So far, Parliament has decisively knocked down Mrs. May’s deal, but also decided against removing her from power entirely.

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